Rain garden planter

   
Amid the overall chaos of climate change, different communities will face individual threats. For Lewes, the main challenge may well be the traditional one: various forms of flooding. Floods caused by river and tide are perhaps best dealt with by local and national government, and work carried out since the 2000 event now protects most of the town (though for how long, is anybody's guess). Flash flooding, on the other hand, is a rather more local phenomenon - in an urban environment, it is usually caused by runoff from roofs and tarmac - and its risk may be minimised by local action. 
 
 
Amid the overall chaos of climate change, different communities will face individual threats. For Lewes, the main challenge may well be the traditional one: various forms of flooding. Floods caused by river and tide are perhaps best dealt with by local and national government, and work carried out since the 2000 event now protects most of the town ( though for how long, is anybody's guess ). Flash flooding, on the other hand, is a rather more local phenomenon - in an urban environment, it is usually caused by runoff from roofs and tarmac - and its risk may be minimised by local action. 
 
To illustrate this point, Transition Town Lewes have installed a rain garden planter at Trinity Church, Southover, with the cooperation of and financial support from the church authorities. This kind of planter slows down the flow of water from roof to sewer, giving the latter time to cope with a sudden downpour. As a bonus, the plant roots, compost and gravel filter out a certain amount of pollution, which would otherwise travel down the river to the sea, and then end up on your plate the next time you visit your local chippie. Read on...